TRIANGLE by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen: The First of a New Trilogy

April 22, 2017

Triangle by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen

So many good reads to recommend for our youngest book lovers!  We recently reviewed Little Red, The Bad Guys, and Baby Loves Quarks, and the hits keep on coming.  Last fall, we mourned the last of Jon Klassen’s Hat series (We Found a Hat ), and fortunately we are now able to celebrate the first of a new trilogy with Triangle.  The latest book is an ode to shapes, especially Triangle himself, the hero of the tale.  He’s a bit of a trickster, out to play a sneaky trick on his friend Square.  The sly humor of the story tricks not only Square, but Triangle, who ends up trapped in his own home.  And there are clever surprises for us as readers, too.  It’s the kind of  intriguing picture book we have come to expect from both of these award-winning authors.  Great for young audiences who appreciate the repetition and delightful illustrations–and a treat for adult readers, who love the wit and off-beat humor of the feud between the shapes, the emotions told only through the eyes.  Lots of fun–and such a delight to know two more are in the works.

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CIRCLE by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen: Completing the Shapes Trilogy

March 10, 2019

Circle by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen

When this author duo gets together, the results are magical.  We have enjoyed the first two books in their Shapes series, Triangle, and Square, and have been eagerly awaiting the publication of Circle.  In the book dedicated to Triangle, there is some trickster humor going on between the two friends, Triangle and Square.  Then, in Square, we are introduced to the third amigo, Circle.  The final book, devoted to her, brings the three friends together in an adventure.  Practical Circle has some rules for her explorations.  But what happens when she has to break those rules to save her friend Triangle? The illustrations are genius; how does Klassen show so much emotion and wit with such a limited palette and simple shapes?  The sly humor is evident, though not quite as much as in the first two books.  But the philosophical musing is amped up a bit, I thought.  The ambiguous ending is growing on me, especially since I have been sharing the book with young friends who use their imaginations to talk about what scary thing–shape?–is in the cave.  At first reading, I didn’t appreciate it as much as I have come to.  My recommendation is to share with your friends, students, and family and see what discussions grow out of it.  The intended audience seemed to catch on to the magic before I did!


SQUARE by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen

May 19, 2018

Square by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen

I love the new shape trilogy that Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen have created.  Triangle was the first and we adored it, as you can tell from our post.  Square is equally good, but very different.  Square is a hard worker, but a bit of a plodder.  Every day, he moves a heavy bock from below ground to above ground, creating a new pile.  Circle, Square’s friend, is mightily impressed when she sees his “artistic” work.  She declares him a genius!  This is troubling to Square, as he loves Circle, and wants to create something to please her, so he tries something a bit different.  Does he succeed with his new creation–or not?  What does it mean to be creative?  The story ends on an ambiguous note that begs discussion.  The wry humor these authors bring to their children’s books is in evidence here.  Can’t wait for the third book–about our new friend, Circle!


RED RISING – Making YA Dystopia Fresh

March 14, 2014

-posted by Meghan

51txswPUCWL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-v3-big,TopRight,0,-55_SX278_SY278_PIkin4,BottomRight,1,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_You’re totally over the dystopic YA genre, right?  How many times can people try and rip off the (brilliant and successful) Hunger Games formula:  love triangle, oppressed world of the future, girl that saves the day by becoming resourceful, tough and selfless?  Each series seems to get less successful, or more clearly written to cash in on a current trend.  So perhaps you’ve given up.  Moved over to reading something else for your (or your students or kids) YA fix.  Like the Game of Thrones type “ye olde kingdom” series  (some are among the best series out there today, like Tamora Pierce’s Trickster series, Maas’ Assassin books and A.C. Gaughen’s Scarlett books that take on Robin Hood mythology).  Or Steampunk, which if you haven’t read any of that genre, is a super fun different world (Scott Westerfeld’s Leviathan trilogy or Gail Carriger’s Finishing School series are good starting places…).

But… before you vow not to see the world through dystopic glasses again, we have a new book you’ve got to read.  Red Rising by Pierce Brown.

Here’s a synopsis that won’t give anything too important away – it takes place in the future, a future where due to lack of resources, we’ve colonized Mars.  The world there has been divided into color castes – from lowly Reds, who mine the precious substance that society runs on deep below the surface of the planet, to Golds, who run everything.  But much like in the Hunger Games, even the higher castes are made to fight to the death for their place in the pecking order.  Guess what caste our hero, Darrow, belongs to?  If you’ve read a single YA book, you know he’s a Red, and that he’s going places and will be a leader in a revolution.

But soon the similarities stop, or at least the plotting and characters get so good, so nuanced and detailed and real that you don’t mind if it is a familiar formula.  Darrow is happy to be part of the society he lives in.  He’s married to the love of his life.  He’s good at what he does.  He’s complacent.  So when Eo, his love, dies, he begins to fight.  Because he has no reason not to.

He is resurrected and remade into the image of a Gold, and sent to the Gold academy to fight for a place in society.  This fight has shades of Lord of the Flies, Game of Thrones, The Hunger Games, Percy Jackson and Roman mythology.  Yet because Darrow, and the friends he makes, the allusions feel like meeting old friends in the pages, not like a rip off.

Anything else we can say will either give too much away (and there are surprising twists and turns, violence galore, and heartbreak that will leave you reaching for tissues) or risk turning off readers by endless comparisons.

Go get this book – we think it’s one of the best in YA in the last several years, and certainly one of the best debut novels in a very long time.  Then come back and tell us your thoughts.  Derivative or divine?  Let us know!


Recommended: THE RAVEN BOYS

February 16, 2013

-posted by Meghan

This one is oddly personal to me.  So it may be that you wouldn’t love it as much as I did.  But if you’re YA crazy, like me, Hollywood, and apparently, the rest of the world, I think you’ll really enjoy it…

ravenThe Raven Boys, by Maggie Stiefvater
Synopsis:
What should feel like a very familiar tale (young love triangle, supernatural elements, attractive teen angst, family drama – all that’s missing is a dystopic future setting) manages to feel fresh in Steifvater’s (The Scorpio Races) capable hands.  While Scorpio was perhaps a better written book, this is the book that pulls you in.  The characters are more relatable.  Blue is the main character – a girl growing up in a family of psychics without any ability of her own, except a strange ability to magnify the gifts of others.  She lives in a prep school town, where the smart local girls know not to mess with the Aglionby boys.  And then Blue (of course) falls in with a quartet of boys, all with secrets of their own.  One of whom she has seen dead.  And he just might be her true love. Oh, and she’s been burdened with the knowledge that if she kisses her true love, he’ll die.  All that sounds far more soapy than it comes across – and explaining that doesn’t even touch the search for a long dead Welsh King, or the workings of the ley lines the boys (and others) have been searching for for year.  All of that plotting is almost incidental to the heart of the story – the story of friendships and love between friends.  Because much more than romance, the love is between the boys who form a family, and the girl they allow into their group.  Since this is a planned series, the romances which begin in this book will surely become more integral to the plot, but for this first book, it’s about friendship.  And that’s a pretty great core story for any age to read.

Hey, Hollywood, listen up!
It’s no secret that I love YA books.  But there have been so many, and they have become so formulaic (and transparent in their attempts to score movie deals and become the next Twilight) that I’ve almost had to stop reading new ones.  And the ones that do actually  get made into movies look so horrifically miscast (except Hunger Games!) that they ruin the books for me (Beautiful Creatures and City of Bones cast inept lead actresses, and even Insurgent cast a good actress who is completely wrong for the role in Shailene Woodley – but may redeem it with the casting of Kate Winslet) and I now can’t even finish reading the series.  I mean, this isn’t Harry Potter, but I do feel strangely protective of these characters, and really hope they don’t get ruined by a bad movie.  So please, Hollywood, stop trying to make a quick buck on churning out movies based on books that actually mean something to people.  And YA writers?  Take a page from Maggie Steifvater’s book, and write some characters that we can relate to, with no thought of a million dollar book deal.  Thank you.

How about you?  What books do you feel a connection to, and oddly protective of?  And have you read this?  Do I like it out of proportion?


The Math Adventure Continues

October 29, 2011

-posted by Meghan

Molly & Jacob will be starting Kindergarten next fall.  Since we live in Los Angeles, that means I get to spend this whole fall freaking out, touring all the various charter, magnet, & neighborhood schools, determining what size, focus, and educational philosophy works best for both of my kids.  And then freaking out again.  So I’ve been thinking about what I like and dislike about the ways schools are set up and taught, and the only conclusion I’ve come to so far is that preschool is perfect.  It’s a multi-age room.  There are no grades.  And there is no separation of subjects – when they study dinosaurs, they talk about science, math, history and literature, but it’s all rolled into one long free flowing (partially student led) exploration.  When I think about friends who hate math, they’re thinking about an isolated Geometry class in high school – not the concept of the beauty of math in our everyday world.  And that’s what we both loved in all of these books – they continue to roll math into something beautiful and useful and a part of other thoughts and discussions and ideas.  These books all fall somewhere in the middle – they are more than a picture book, but an easier read than a YA novel.  And they hold the interest of a wide age range, as they beautifully illustrate either a mathematical principal, or a way to see the world using math…

Our current favorite:

You Can Count on Monsters by Richard Evan Schwartz

I love this book.   My 4 1/2 year old twins love this book.  My husband who tutored calculus throughout college and is really, really, really good at higher math loves this book.  You will love this book.  Beginning with an explanation of multiplication, prime numbers, composites and factorization that will lose your average 4 (or possibly even 10) year old, but will refresh adults, it turns into an art project which shows each number 1-100 as a monster made up of it’s prime composites.  A factor tree and dot groupings on one side of the page show how a number is broken down into it’s smallest factors, and then those numbers are each represented as a monster that somehow incorporates that number into its being.  So the monster of ’27’ is illustrated by three ‘3’ monsters (triangle heads denote their ‘three-ness’) cavorting together. Part art, part visual poetry, all math. If you’re not someone who sees the world in numbers, or the beautiful patterns in math, this will help you begin to think this way.

And some more wonderful ones:

A Very Improbable Story:  A Math Adventure by Edward Einhorn

The Adventures of Penrose the Mathematical Cat by Theoni Pappas

Tiger Math:  Learning to Graph from a Baby Tiger by Ann Whitehead Nagda

Crimes and Mathdemeanors by Leith Hathout

The Absolute Value of Mike by Kathryn Erskine


Classic Books for Early Adolescents

June 11, 2011

What a great age.  (Nope, not even kidding!)  Early adolescents–around age 10 to 14–are an intriguing group.  Their complex thinking processes, creativity, awareness of the larger world, and daily grappling with fairness–what’s right, what’s wrong, who decides. . .not to mention that they possess often wacky and playful senses of humor.  It’s a wonderful time to introduce young readers to books that we loved at their age as well as some of the great new “classics-in-the-making.”  Our first list was way too long, so we narrowed it down to these 10.  We tried to pick books that we loved (of course), but wanted to make sure these were all books with intriguing characters, strong writing, and “staying power.”   Because this is an age group that thrives on discussion, we were careful to choose books that are “conversation worthy.”  Hopefully you’ll see here some old friends to revisit with your early adolescents–and also some new titles to discover and discuss together.

~~~

The Golden Compass Series ( His Dark Materials) by Phillip Pullman

This series belongs alongside Harry Potter and The Hunger Games books as modern classics.  They appeal to all readers, though written for this age group.  Exploring themes of religion, friendship, politics, family, the notion of magic and of other worlds, it touches on every major theme that resonates with young teens– or really, with all of us.  The first book begins in another world, similar to, yet wholly unlike, our own.  The orphan (or is she?) Lyra Belaqua, and her animal familiar (daemon, they call them) Pantalaimon are our guides into this world.  The second book continues in our own world with another abandoned youngster, Will.  Their worlds and many others will collide before the adventure is finished.  These phenomenal books hold up to (in fact, they practically demand) several readings.

*

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy  by Douglas Adams

More spoof and parody than actual science fiction, this hysterical book is also worthy of several reads, each time bringing you new insights and discoveries.  The characters are terrific.  You’ll meet the unfortunate Arthur Dent, who basically has no idea what is going on as he travels the galaxy with his side-kick Ford Prefect, his remarkable friend from Betelgeuse.  Then there’s Zaphod Beeblebrox, with his two heads, three arms, and cavalier attitude; Trillian the lovely Earth girl with the Heart of Gold; Slartibartfast the planet builder and fjord-maker extraordinaire; and  of course, Marvin the eternally depressed robot. Life-“loathe it or ignore it, you can’t like it” is his  philosophy. Adams’ writing is often compared to Vonnegut, Monty Python, and Terry Pratchett.  Imagine the  conversations kids can engage in, sparked by off-beat characters roaming the galaxy asking questions  such as, “Why are people born? Why do they die? What is my purpose in life? Does it really, cosmically speaking, matter if I don’t get up?”

*

The Hunger Gamesby Suzanne Collins

We both recommend and gift this series to everyone we know age 11 and up.  They are the kind of books that you just can’t put down.  Beautifully written and intensely engrossing, they enchant boys and girls, men and women alike.  A mere synopsis does not do it justice: love triangle, post apocalyptic world, kids fighting gladiator style to the death on TV as entertainment/repression… it’s all been done, but never like this.  And never with characters like this.  Katniss Everdeen is a heroine who is the antithesis of Bella in the Twilight series, which is reason enough to love and root for her.  She has been the only thing keeping her family alive since the death of her father, so naturally when her younger sister is selected to play the Hunger Games, she volunteers to take her place.  She doesn’t realize she just might win – and become the symbol or hope and revolution for the whole country.

*

Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene

Stories about World War II have a decided pull for readers of all ages.  Perhaps we all find a certain fascination in how and why people can be so cruel to others.  Or perhaps we find beauty in the strength and love and grace that people are still capable of in the worst of circumstances.  Whatever the reason, this book presents a different side of the story- what happens when you meet the monster, and they aren’t a monster at all, but perhaps are kinder to you than your own family?  German prisoners of war are shipped to a prison camp in a small southern town.  They are Nazis, and should be hated, feared and despised, yet when 12-year-old ( Jewish) Patty meets Anton, she finds a true friend.  This books will definitely make you cry, but it will also make you think and feel.  A couple of interesting websites to pair with this book: bettegreene.com, with insight and details from the author, and this blog “Days of My Life,”  about the daily life of a teen-aged girl in Iraq  who calls herself “Sunshine” and is no stranger to living through terror and violence while keeping friendship and peace in the forefront of her mind.

*

The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier

What makes a person decide to stand up for what they believe?  In this case, Jerry  refuses to sell chocolates for his school fundraiser–and the ramifications spin out of control.  The Chocolate War is considered the first psychological thriller written specifically for an adolescent audience.  This book not only shows a reader the world of teenage boys, it puts the reader in the shoes of the three main characters. Cormier brings them to life by realistically describing the characters’ feelings. A novel of good versus evil with real people in real situations. On many levels, a disturbing book, but one that invites discussion.

*

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

“Write what you know” is what they (who are they, anyway?!) always tell young writers, and Louisa May Alcott may have yearned to write exotic thrillers, but it was writing what she knew – the story of four girls growing up together in 19th Century New England – that earned her centuries of devoted readers.  Though it is a simple story, it touches on all the things we all think about as we grow up: Who am I?  What do I want from life?  Who do I love?  How can I be a good person?  Those questions, and the transparent honesty in the telling of the coming-of-age tale, keeps this book evergreen.  It may not be the hippest book on the planet, but it’s the one that many “little women” turn to over and over again for comfort, insight and reassurance.

*

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

Jess and Leslie, two fifth graders become unlikely best friends.  Jess is determined to be the fastest runner in their class, and is, until Leslie, a self-proclaimed tomboy moves into town and is even faster.  In the nearby woods, they create a special kingdom they name Terabithia.  Readers are caught in the magic of their stories, imaginary world, friendship. It’s one of those books that often represents a milestone for young teens, as they can empathize as a narrator their own age copes with real-world life drama and loss.

*

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

A moving account set during the “relocation” of the Jews in Denmark during World War II.  (Yes, another WWII book!)  Two best friends growing up during the Nazi occupation experience the horrors that take place around them–and to them–with disbelief, fear. . .and courage.   Though only a young pre-teen herself, Annemarie puts her life in grave danger to help her friend and their family escape the concentration camps.  Though very appropriate for young readers, there is no neat resolution at the end, much like real life.  A book that generates rich discussion and heartfelt connections.  It’s the kind of book that readers are drawn to read and reread at different stages of their lives.

*

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

It was a dark and stormy night…  the night that Meg Murray, her little brother Charles Wallace and their new friend Calvin O’Keeffe use a wrinkle in time (or a tesseract) follow three witches (women?  spirits? stars?) to the dark planet in search of Dr.  Murray, who disappeared years ago while working on a secret government project concerning space and time travel.  This book is part science fiction, part coming-of-age, all wonderful.  Meg is a delightful, awkward, prickly and relate-able girl, and the best part is that Wrinkle is not only the first in the series, there is another series after it that follows Meg’s daughter Polly, so we really get to know “what happens when she grows up.”

*

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

It’s easy to overlook what a great story this is by dismissing it as a creaky old classic, but that would be a terrible mistake!  For any kid (or adult who has forgotten how fun a fantastic swashbuckler can be) who likes the Pirates of the Caribbean movies, pirate stories in general (we sure love ’em!) or just a good old tale of good and evil (you can definitely see some Harry Potter and some Peter Pan in both hero and villain here) you can’t do better than Jim and Long John Silver.  Pirates, good guys, hidden treasure, mutiny… this has it all and keeps everyone turning just one more page.  The classic N.C. Wyeth illustrations are beautiful.  This books makes for a fantastic family read aloud too, as it enchants younger readers and delights older ones.


Early Readers

May 29, 2007

From 5 to 9 years old

Early-Readers-Banner

As children become more comfortable with reading familiar books over and over again, alone and with the adults around them, they naturally start “cracking the code” and using their knowledge of the world to understand the words and pictures in books—and read on their own! No need to stop reading aloud books they can’t read by themselves: we have several “kid-tested” books on the lists below that are wonderful read-alouds to share together. We also include “easy reader” books that children can explore and read without adult help—books that have predictable structures and patterns without sacrificing quality of language and illustrations. Enjoy!

Book Lists

RETHINKING THANKSGIVING THROUGH PICTURE BOOKS

November 13th is World Kindness Day:  Picture Books to Read and Share

A Trio of New Early Reader Chapter Books

Classics: Read-to-Me Books

Celebrating Literacy:  Three New Picture Books

Comics and Graphic Novels for Early Readers

Feisty Girls in Early Reader Chapter Books

New Spring Picture Books for Young Readers

What We’re Reading:  Some Terrific Bilingual Picture Books

Resistance! Part I:  Learning From Our Moral Ancestors:  Recommended Picture Books for Young Readers

Mischievous Boys

Early Reader Chapter Books for Boys

Great Role Models for Boys

Classics: Read by Myself

Other Great Read by Myself Books

The Sounds of Language: Multicultural Picture Books for Young Children

Chapter Books for Beginning Readers

Math Picture Books

More Math Picture Books

The Math Adventure Continues

Picture Books:  Understanding the Middle East

Introducing Jazz for Young “Hip Cats”

Cowgirls, Cowboys, and Cowcookies. . .

Series Recommendations for Early Readers

Invitation to Imagination:  Fairy Gardens

New to School

Author! Author! Great Picture Books About Being a Writer

Picture Books for Writers

Halloween Fun

Aliens!  New Children’s Literature for UFO Lovers

My First Hanukkah Books

Celebrating the New Year with a Trio of Books for Young Readers

Twins in School-Online Resources

Musicians When They Were Children

Mischievous Boys

Celebrating the Silent Movies in Children’s Literature

More New Fall Picture Books

Celebrating a Love of Words

New Picture Books That Celebrate Snow

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Nursery & Preschoolers

May 29, 2007

From 3 to 6 years old

preschool-banner

Children who are still toddlers often begin being active readers. When a 3-year-old picks up a familiar book and retells a story in an expressive voice, she is reading. When a 4-year old talks through a brand-new book creating a new story, complete with literary terms like, “Once upon a time,” or “The end,” he is reading. They are both accomplishing what more experienced readers and writers do: they are living into the story, and using some of the general mechanics that go along with reading, such as turning pages, holding the book right side up, and using the terms that go along with a book experience. You’ll see quite a bit of overlap in the lists in this category, so feel free to keep browsing the book recommendations for older –or younger—readers.

Book Lists

Building Your Classic Library

Alphabet Books

Many Languages, Many Alphabets

Counting Books

More Math Picture Books

Going to Kindergarten

Picture Books about Museums

Comics and Graphic Novels for Early Readers

My First Hanukkah Books

Ballet Books for Tiny Dancers

Sweet Monsters

Library Love

Trucks, Trucks, Trucks

Introducing Map Books

Books for Caped Crusaders

Precocious Princesses

Pirate Books for Little Mateys

Baby Love

Hello!

Multicultural Picture Books

Introducing Jazz for Young “Hip Cats”

Cowgirls, Cowboys, and Cowcookies. . .

Series Recommendations for Early Readers

New to School

Author! Author! Great Picture Books About Being a Writer

Halloween Fun

Twice as Nice or Double the Trouble?  Early Childhood Books for Twins

Musicians When They Were Children

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Get Interactive

Get Ready to Celebrate Chocolate Cake Day, January 27th

THIS MOOSE BELONGS TO ME by Oliver Jeffers

GROOVY JOE:  ICE CREAM AND DINOSAURS  by Eric Litwin, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld

And the Winner is. . .VIVA FRIDA!

Have a Party With Your Bear Day is November 16th

Downton Abbey for Children’s Literature Fans

Fairy Gardens II:  Backyard Adventures

Put Me in the Story:  My Name is Not. . .

Picture Books for Writers

Back to School Books

May 19th is Circus Day

Everyday Math

Otto the Book Bear:  A Review

What We’re Reading:  Some Terrific Bilingual Picture Books

April 4th-Tater Day

Beautiful Yetta, The Yiddish Chicken:  A Passover Picture Book

Creativity in Action

National Fairy Tale Day

I Spy. . .Literacy!

Creative Fun – Images and Designs, Cookie Cutters and Coloring Pages

A New Love and Lens for the Zoo

Being in the Book:  THE SNOWY DAY

Countdown to Halloween

Related Posts

WINDOWS by Julia Denos

A BIG MOONCAKE FOR LITTLE STAR by Grace Lin

CINDERELLA OF THE NILE

THE DAY YOU BEGIN by Jacqueline Woodson

HOW TO BE AN ELEPHANT by Katherine Roy

LA LA LA:  A STORY OF HOPE by Kate DiCamillo

Bear and Wolf by Daniel Salmieri

THEY SAY BLUE by Jillian Tamake

LEXIE THE WORD WRANGLER

THE WOLF, THE DUCK , AND THE MOUSE by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen

SNOW AND ROSE: A FAIRYTALE REIMAGINED

FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY by Ntozake Change

I Am a Cat by Galia Bernstein

TALES OF BUNJITSU BUNNY by John Himmelman

Dory Fantasmagory:  Head in the Clouds by Abby Hanlon

RUDAS: NINO’S HORRENDOUS HERMANITA’S

TRIANGLE by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen

SQUARE by Mac Barnett and John Klassen

Love by Matt de la Peña, Illustrated by Loren Long

Baby Monkey:  Private Eye by Brian Selznick and David Serlin

After the Fall:  How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again by Dan Santat

A TOWER OF GIRAFFES

BABY LOVES QUARKS! New Board Book for the Littlest Scientist

THE BAD GUYS

COYOTE MOON by Maria Gianferrari, illustrated by Bagram Ibatouline

Perfect Book to Celebrate Penguin Awareness Day:  PENGUIN PROBLEMS

British Children’s Literature for Children: Two Treats to Share

SHHH! WE HAVE A PLAN

WE FOUND A HAT  by Jon Klassen:  Book 3 in the hat series

Poetry for the Whole Family:  SAIL AWAY by Langston Hughes, illustrated by Ashley Bryan

FIREBIRD by Misty Copeland:  A Review and Recommendation

IF YOU EVER WANT TO BRING A PIANO TO THE BEACH, DON’T!

This Moose Belongs to Me by Oliver Jeffers

April 30th is Save the Frogs Day

Max the Brave

Who Done it?

Sloths:  A Trio of Books to Delight Young Readers

July! Time for More Ice Cream and Hot Dogs

New Interactive Books for Young Readers

Mustache Fever–in Picture Books

The Princess in Black

Winter is Coming

Enzo Races in the Rain!

For Your Growing Alphabet Bookshelf:  Once Upon an Alphabet

National Hat Day

The Pigeon Needs a Bath

Nino Wrestles the World:  A Review

What Happened to PETE THE CAT books?

Edgar Gets Ready for Bed

Aliens!  New Children’s Literature for UFO Lovers

New Books Make Great Holiday Gifts:  Picture Book Edition

More Mo!:  Behind the Scenes with Mo Willems (Plus:  I’m a Frog!)

Aliens! New Children’s Literature for UFO Lovers

CARNIVORES:  A Review

Pete the Cat at the Beach

Library Mouse:  A Museum Adventure

Celebrating Creativity in New Picture Books

The Perfect Flower Girl:  A Review

The Sky of Afghanistan:  A Review

This is Not My Hat!:  Review

A Trio of New Picture Books Celebrating Winter

New Winter Holiday Nooks! We Recommend. . .

My Hands Sing the Blues

Mo Willems:  My Hero!

Revisiting the Night Sky:  Featuring Picture Books!

One Good Book About Golf

Internaltional Children’s Book Day, April 2nd

The Country Bunny and the Little Gold Shoes:  An Easter Book!

Twins in School-Online Resources

Who are we reading now?  Roald Dahl

Book Review:  Isabella:  Girl on the Go

How Many Donkeys:  A New Arabic Counting Tale

Cool Cats Head to School

Children Around the World

The Return of Favorite Characters

Speaking Some Dead Languages

My Name is Not Alexander

Books:  Eat or Be Eaten

Book Review:  ASTRO THE STELLAR SEA LION

What’s in a Name?

My Name is Not Isabella:  Book Review

More Ken Nesbitt with MORE BEARS

A Taste of Home

National Train Day!

For the Easter Basket. . .

A Non-traditional Passover

Dump and Stir

Two New Books for Spring

Inscribe It

Supercapes for Superheroes

Counting on Kids

Two New Books by Rachel Isadora

I Hate TV. . .But YouTube is Another Story

A Special Reading Place

First the Egg

On Flamingos and Other Obsessions

Ministry of Funny Voices

Book Pairings:  One for You and One for Me

Holiday Shopping for Book Lovers

Eat, Read, and Be Merry!

Family Traditions:  Don’t Forget the Books!

A Few of Our Favorite Things: Kids Books 2009

Celebrating The Snowy Day

Celebrating Spoken Soul in Picture Books

A Pipkin of Pepper (What We’re Reading Right Now)

ABC Update


Infants & Toddlers

May 29, 2007

From Birth to 4 years old

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You can start sharing books with babies from their very first day. Babies love the warmth and comfort of being cuddled in your arms, and hearing the lilt of your voice as you share a story. They’ll associate the sight of a book with special time with you. Pretty soon, they’ll want books they can grab and touch, eat and teethe on, as well as enjoying a remembered story. Birth to four years old covers a wide range of abilities and interests, so we have lots of different lists to get you started.

Book Lists

Building a Classic Library

Gifts for a New Baby

A Trio of Board Books for New Parents

Hip Books for Trendy Toddlers

A-B-C’s

1-2-3’s

Board Books

All About Art Board Books

Hello!

Trucks, Trucks, Trucks

Library Love

New Spring Picture Books for Young Readers

Books for Caped Crusaders

Introducing Jazz for Young “Hip Cats”

Twice as Nice? Or Double the Trouble?: Early Childhood Books for Twins

Twins in School-Online Resources

Baby Love

Sweet Monsters

A Trio of Summer Board Books

A Trio of Books to Celebrate Sloths

Get Interactive

RHYME FLIES:  Wordplay in a Board Book

8 LITTLE PLANETS by Chris Ferrie

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY FOR BABIES:  AN INTRIGUING BOARD BOOK

WE FOUND A HAT  by Jon Klassen:  Book 3 in the hat series

THIS MOOSE BELONGS TO ME by Oliver Jeffers

GROOVY JOE:  ICE CREAM AND DINOSAURS  by Eric Litwin, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld

I Spy. . .Literacy!

Knitting Project – Momma Bunny from The Runaway Bunny

Toddler Games – “Smell Dat”, a Spice Game

Sewing Project – Supercapes for Superheroes!

Creative Fun – Images and Designs, Cookie Cutters and Coloring Pages

A New Love and Lens for the Zoo

Being in the Book:  THE SNOWY DAY

Related Posts

A BIG MOONCAKE FOR LITTLE STAR by Grace Lin

THEY SAY BLUE by Jillian Tamake

I Am a Cat by Galia Bernstein

Baby Monkey:  Private Eye by Brian Selznick and David Serlin

LA LA LA:  A STORY OF HOPE by Kate DiCamillo

HOW TO BE AN ELEPHANT by Katherine Roy

Dance by Matthew Van Fleet

THE WOLF, THE DUCK , AND THE MOUSE by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen

TRIANGLE by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen

SQUARE by Mac Barnett and John Klassen

BABY LOVES QUARKS! New Board Book for the Littlest Scientist

Perfect Book to Celebrate Penguin Awareness Day:  PENGUIN PROBLEMS

British Children’s Literature for Children: Two Treats to Share

SHHH! WE HAVE A PLAN

New Books for Toddlers that Parents Enjoy Reading

IF YOU EVER WANT TO BRING A PIANO TO THE BEACH, DON’T

WAITING by Kevin Henkes: A Review

July! Time for More Ice Cream and Hot Dogs

New Interactive Books for Young Readers

Mustache Fever–in Picture Books

National Hat Day

Have a Party With Your Bear Day is November 16th

Edgar Gets Ready for Bed

Nino Wrestles the World:  A Review

This is Not My Hat!:  Review

Favorite Colors–From Babies and Beyond

Otto the Book Bear:  A Review

Revisiting the Night Sky:  New Picture Books

The Country Bunny and the Little Gold Shoes:  An Easter Book!

How Many Donkeys?  A New Arabic Counting Tale

Book Review:  Isabella Girl on the Go

Wow! Oceans!:  Recommended!

What to Read to a Newborn

My First Hanukkah Books

Summer Reads (2011):  Infants and Toddler

My Name is Not Isabella:  Book Review

The Return of Favorite Characters

What’s in a Name?

More Ken Nesbitt with MORE BEARS

For the Easter Basket.. .

A Non-traditional Passover

Dump and Stir

Two New Books for Spring

A World of Alphabet Blocks

Many Languages, Many Alphabets

Teaching Mommy to Read

Serendipity

Checkout!

Inscribe It

Two New Books by Rachel Isadora

I Hate TV. . .But YouTube is Another Story

A Special Reading Place

First the Egg

On Flamingos and Other Obsessions

When the Story Isn’t the Narrative

Ministry of Funny Voices

Book Pairings:  One for You and One for Me

Holiday Shopping for Book Lovers

Family Traditions:  Don’t Forget the Books

A Book I Don’t Like

A Pipkin of Pepper (What We’re Reading Right Now)

Further Resources

hbtHow Babies Talk: The Magic and Mystery of Language in the First Three Years

by Roberta Michnick Golinkoff & Kathy Hitsh-Pasek

If we could recommend just one book on early language development for parents, care-givers, and teachers, this would be the one. The authors have created a wonderful resource for a wide audience that shares current understanding of how child language develops, what to expect with the children in our lives, and how to nurture each stage. The research is written in an easy-to-read style, and followed by simple “Try This. . .” strategies.

 

Learning to Read and Write: Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Young Children

This position statement is issued jointly by two professional organizations dedicated to children’s literacy education and development (the National Association for the Education of Young Children[NAEYC] and the International Reading Association [IRA].) Don’t be scared off! As their introduction indicates, “the principles and practices suggested here also will be of interest to any adults who are in a position to influence a young child’s learning and development—parents, grandparents,older siblings, tutors, and other community members.” This is a wonderful article about early childhood literacy development.